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  • A Message to Parents of Teen Drivers

    Traffic crashes are the leading cause of death for teens and young adults. More than 5,500 young people die every year in car crashes and thousands more are injured. Parents can play an important role in reducing these numbers and keeping their teens alive.

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  • A Parent's Guide to Teen Parties

    As a parent, you know the importance of your teen's social life and that parties are a way to socialize and relax. But an unsupervised or poorly planned party can result in unwanted or even tragic consequences. However, parental responsibility is the key to a fun and safe party.

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  • Acne—How to Treat and Control It

    Almost all teens get zits at one time or another. It's called acne. Whether your case is mild or severe, there are things you can do to keep it under control. Read on to find out how.

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  • Building Strong Bones: Why Calcium Counts

    As you grow, you need calcium to build strong bones and a healthy body. Getting plenty of calcium while you are young also makes your bones strong and keeps them strong for your entire lifetime.

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  • Deciding to Wait

    No matter what you've heard, read, or seen, not everyone your age is having sex, including oral sex and intercourse. In fact, more than half of all teens choose to wait until they're older to have sex. If you have already had sex but are unsure if you should again, then wait before having sex again.

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  • Eating Disorders: Anorexia and Bulimia

    The 2 most well-known eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.Anorexia is self-starvation. Bulimia is a disorder in which a person eats large amounts of food (binges) and then tries to undo the effects of the binge in some way, usually by ridding the body of the food that was eaten.

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  • For Today's Teens: A Message From Your Pediatrician

    Now that you are getting older, you have different health needs than you did when you were younger. However, your pediatrician is still there to help you stay healthy.

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  • Gambling: Not a Safe Thrill

    Many Americans gamble for fun. However, for young people, gambling may become a serious addiction. The chances of a young gambler getting "hooked" are far greater than those of an adult.

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  • Get Fit, Stay Healthy

    Being fit means you're in good shape, you have energy, you're active, and you don't get tired easily during the day. Most people who are fit also feel pretty good about themselves.

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  • Headaches: What Teens Need to Know

    A lot of teens do. In fact, 50% to 75% of all teens report having at least one headache per month!

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  • Health Care for College Students

    College is filled with many opportunities to learn and experience life. You'll be responsible for making your own choices, including choices about your health. Following is important information to help you stay healthy and safe on your new journey.

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  • Help Stop Teenage Suicide
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  • Home Drug Testing: What Parents Need to Know

    Remember that your teen’s doctor can help assess whether your teen has a drug problem and a laboratory test is not always needed. However, if a drug test is recommended, your teen should know about it. The American Academy of Pediatrics opposes drug tests without a teen’s knowledge and consent.

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  • Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Teens: Information for Parents

    It is important for parents of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) teens to remember that each child is unique and will have their own experiences and feelings. “Coming out” is a lifelong journey of understanding, acknowledging, and sharing one’s gender identity or sexual orientation

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  • Managing Depression or Sadness: Tips for Families—Mental Health Toolkit

    Children experience depression differently than adults. Your child may not be able to tell you they are feeling sad, and they may not even feel sad at all. Instead, you may notice your child seems irritable, frustrated, restless, discouraged, or tired. These are some other common signs of depression

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  • Managing Inattention, Impulsivity, and Hyperactivity: Tips for Families—Mental Health Toolkit

    Inattention and impulsivity are normal for young children. But by the time they’re in school, most children can pay attention for a longer time and can think and plan before they act. If your school-aged child behaves more like what you would expect from a younger child, this behavior may be a sign

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